Waste bin designer designs bin with built-in brain

A leading waste bin designer, Angus Carnie, has developed a bin specifically for the clinical waste and confidential shredding sectors that uses ultrasound to ensure the bins are never full!

Carnie in a recent interview explained that in the confidential waste and clinical waste it is imperative that waste containers are not EVER over filled for obvious reasons in the clinical waste sector and the huge statutory penalties for breaches of the data protection laws (up to £500,000 in UK) in the confidential waste sector.

The bins use highly sophisticated ultrasound with multiple sensors which are calibrated to exactly match specific types of bins. The readings these sensors provide are exceptionally accurate. The sensors are totally wireless and cannot be accessed inadvertently and are built in at the manufacturing stage. The sensors provide a traffic light system which instantly indicates bin status – green for empty, amber for 50% full and red for full. Plus, a plethora of other information which could be used to help plan collections.

The information can then be monitored 24hours per day via any computer or internet connected device by the contactor and/or customer.

Whilst not every site will require this system it will be a huge benefit where operators or members of staff have to be allocated to check these bins which may mean travelling considerable distances to manually check the bins.

This system is now fully operational and manufactured in the UK.

Read more at: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/3009926#ixzz4EsJvwTQ1

Well, it might work, but so too should a pair of eyes, provided by each and every user who will do something constructive when the waste sack or bin is approaching its limit.

And if any other ideas are needed, how about a bin with at least 1 leg, and a size 12 boot to kick those who do not discard wastes properly, at the right time and into the correct container? Now that would be useful!

 

 

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